WSUM’s Weekly Adds: 3/20

Every week at WSUM, our Music Director, Izzi, chooses her favorite new releases to add to our music library. Here are this week’s favorites, presented to you by WSUM’s Music Journalism Club.


Honey Cutt, Coasting

HIGHLIGHT TRACKS: “Coasting,” “Fashion School,” “Judas Waltz”

GENRE: Indie rock, jangle pop, bedroom pop

RIYL: Beach Bunny, Snail Mail, Frankie Cosmos

Self-described as “dreamy indie rock with surf sensibilities,” Boston singer-songwriter Kaley Honeycutt definitely delivers on this front in her latest release Coasting. Even though I might be sitting at home in my pajamas as I write this, I can almost imagine myself tanning on a white sandy beach with the catchy guitar hooks on tracks like “Vacation” and “Hung Up On Me.” Honeycutt’s vocals are one of my favorite parts of the album, which range from a low-effort style archetypical of indie rock (“Orange Blossom Trail”) to melancholic croons which make good use of her range (see “Gentleness”). Although a bit lacking as far as variation is concerned, Coasting is a pleasant and uplifting listen for trying times. — Shelby Len


The Garden, Kiss My Super Bowl Ring

HIGHLIGHT TRACKS: “A Struggle,” Kiss My Super Bowl Ring,” “A Fool’s Expedition,” “AMPM Truck” 

GENRE: Art punk, experimental rock, digital hardcore, zolo, hardcore punk

RIYL: Machine Girl, Mr. Bungle, Show Me the Body, Clown Core

With their fourth album, Kiss My Super Bowl Ring, California duo The Garden, expand their already eclectic sound to include pronounced elements of powerviolence, avant-prog, digital hardcore, grunge and breakbeat. Kiss My Super Bowl Ring is a busy album to say the least, exploring a plethora of genres, influences and approaches to create an album that feels like it’s beyond description.

For instance, take a look at the track “A Struggle,” which is a truly manic venture even for experimental rock. The track features melodic synth filled sections as well as momentary lapses into straight up grind, all within the same song. Similarly, “AMPM Truck” may very well be the only dance-punk ever to feature blast beats. It’s infectious chorus and jaunty guitar work truly make it a highlight of the album. 

Kiss My Super Bowl Ring is one incredibly offbeat, outlandish and unorthodox piece of punky experimental rock and I love every second of it. I would heavily recommend this album for anyone searching for eclectic and sharp music that isn’t afraid to be off putting and jarring at times. — Matt Jarosinski


Pale Blue, Breathe

HIGHLIGHT TRACKS: “Breathe (Olive T Remix),” “I Walk Alone at Night”

GENRE: Electronic, electro pop

RIYL: vōx, Grimes, Disclosure

On their newest EP, Breathe, electronic duo Pale Blue present multiple versions of two songs: “Breathe” and “I Walk Alone at Night.” “Breathe” tells of a horribly abusive relationship where “one feels stuck,” as vocalist Elizabeth Wight puts it. “I Walk Alone at Night” paints the terror of rape culture in a woman’s night out. The EP is politically charged, standing out from the genre’s typical feel-good, nostalgia driven vibes. While electronic music typically creates a very vast space, this EP constricts you. Constant repetition, tight and simplistic synth patterns, and very high-pitched, clicky percussion creates anxiety out of thin air, forcing you to sympathize with the narratives. Each remix and remake of the songs adds a different, darker facet. As put by the duo themselves, Breathe is a “dark picture of society as a whole.” — Jane Lazzara


Addy, Eclipse

HIGHLIGHT TRACKS: “Eclipse,” “Equinox,” “Elevator,” “Pond”

GENRE: Indie-folk, indie-rock, folk-rock

RIYL: Cigarettes After Sex, Blossoms, Lord Huron

The rapid currents of a crystal clear stream, the gentle whisper of the wind winding through the meadow, the stillness of night as it blends into day. Or rather, the steady hypnotic strum of acoustic guitars, the hazy and serene vocals, the effortless and pleasant fluidity of each track into the next. Addy’s new album Eclipse is harmonious and peaceful, as if it is capturing the beautiful nature of our planet Earth. There’s something lovely about this album. The complexity of its instrumentals, built from such simple chords, make you want to grab your guitar and sing these songs around a campfire on a crisp summer’s eve. Paired with the vocals and the relatively short lyrics, the calming music with a reliable drum beat is captivating and soothing, as a crisp breeze ruffling the curtains on your window. Spring is finally here, and so is this album. — Martha Kowalski


Check out our playlist of this week’s adds on Spotify below.